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THE VOYAGE OF THE CARDIGAN CASTLE  1876-7
 
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The Cardigan Castle

 

 

The "Cardigan Castle" an iron hulled ship, was built by R & J Evans at Liverpool and launched in 1870. She was 228 feet in length, and 36 feet wide. At the time of the voyage to New Zealand the owners were Richards, Mills & Co.  

 Included in her cargo were 2 cows, an unspecified number of lambs,16 wheels,10 carriages,1 pump,1 fire engine and hose,10 barrels, lead piping, 48 tanks, 325 drums, 2 machine cases,395 kegs, 33 camp ovens, and 18 stoves.

The ship captained by Lewis Davies with 324 emigrants aboard sailed from London on the 30th of September 1876. Of that number, 76 were children and infants. The strenuous voyage was to take 95 days with the loss of 5 adults and 7 children. Two infants born on board also died.

 

 

Philip & Eliza Bint 
1
George Bint 
1
Charlotte Hayward 
1
Walter Bint 
1
Catherine Smith 
1
James Bint 
1
Lester Bint 
1
 William Bint

Bertha Bint

Bint Family UK

 

The Voyage Passenger List  Diary of Sarah Stephens The Passengers' Poem The Ship

 

 

Migration to New Zealand was made more attractive for United Kingdom immigrants. From 1873 the fare of £5 per adult was waived and travel was free. In addition, New Zealand residents could nominate friends and relatives to come and join them. The London office sent out public speakers and recruited local people – book sellers, grocers, schoolteachers – to spread the message. By 1873 there were 53 New Zealand government immigration agents in England, 78 in Scotland, and 46 in Ireland. Newspaper advertisements and posters called for married agricultural labourers and single female domestic servants, provided they were ‘sober, industrious, of good moral character, of sound mind and in good health.

People responded to the call. Many were farm workers facing the end of the golden age of British agriculture. Cheap foreign wheat lowered prices, wages and the demand for labour (numbers of farm workers fell by 16% in the decade). Increasingly, men were hired by the day on a casual basis. Cottage industries, like glove- or lace-making, disappeared, replaced by factories. Housing was poor, police cracked down on poaching game for food, and humanitarian but unpopular legislation ruled out the option of children earning.

 

Philip and Charlotte Bint and their family set off for New Zealand on the 30th of September 1876. It would have been a very uncomfortable time for Charlotte. Added to the usual inconvenience of 19th century maritime travel, she was pregnant and gave birth seven weeks later on November the 20th. They named the child Walter.

 

The "Cardigan Castle" an iron hulled ship, was built by R & J Evans at Liverpool and launched in 1870. She was 228 feet in length, and 36 feet wide. At the time of the voyage to New Zealand the owners were Richards, Mills & Co.  

 Included in her cargo were 2 cows, an unspecified number of lambs,16 wheels,10 carriages,1 pump,1 fire engine and hose,10 barrels, lead piping, 48 tanks, 325 drums, 2 machine cases,395 kegs, 33 camp ovens, and 18 stoves.

The ship captained by Lewis Davies with 324 emigrants aboard sailed from London on the 30th of September 1876. Of that number, 76 were children and infants. The strenuous voyage was to take 95 days with the loss of 5 adults and 7 children. Two infants born on board also died.

 

 

The passengers departed the Blackwall Depot and were taken down the Thames by the steam tug "Royal Victor" to board the Cardigan Castle. The ship was divided into quarters for single women, married couples and single men.  "Almost 300 passengers were assembled on the deck, To give to us a last farewell, Our friends around did flock, And all were grieved to part, And some did in sorrow pine, And most of us we thought of home, And those we left behind." (The Cardigan Castle Poem)   "The Emigrants were a very orderly, respectable lot of people. I was fortunate in having an excellent Matron who managed the girls with great tact. All worked suitably with the Passengers and the ship's company and there were no disturbances or occurrences requiring special comment." Jeremiah Welsh , Ship's Surgeon on "Cardigan Castle" From his end of voyage report in February 1877.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to Marilyn Clarke for the newspaper clipping and Ron & Rae Bint for the ship's ticket.

 

 



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