The Bint Family of New Zealand

 

 

 


 

 The Bint Family of New Zealand

The St. ALBANS, NZ SOANES FAMILY and ARTHUR SOANES 1880's TARATA RECOLLECTIONS
 
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Henry & Elisa Soanes had six children, all boys - Arthur 1881, Bertie 1883, Frank 1886, Herbert 1891, Albert 1894, and Gilbert Alfred 1904. His father Henry Soanes, and uncle Philip Soanes worked together, and described themselves as builders and bricklayers. In April 1899 they bought adjacent quarter acre sections in a small St Albans subdivision, and took the opportunity to build a pair of houses that demonstrated their professional skill. Harry's former house at 45 Ranfurly Street is an elaborately detailed double brick square villa, with a terracotta tile roof. Next door at 41 Ranfurly Street is Philip's former residence. This house, a double brick return bay villa, is similarly constructed, but with plastered details rather than the plain moulded brick of the former, and has an iron roof. 45 Ranfurly Street.

 

Philip & Eliza Bint 
1
George Bint 
1
Charlotte Hayward 
1
Walter Bint 
1
Catherine Smith 
1
James Bint 
1
Lester Bint 
1
 William Bint

Bertha Bint

Bint Family UK

This three-bedroom house was built in 1899 by Arthur's father, Harry Soanes, a bricklayer and builder. He and his brother, Philip, purchased adjacent sections in St Albans and both built homes for their families. (Philip's house, 41 Ranfurly Street, is also registered by the New Zealand Historic Places Trust Pouhere Taonga).  Forty-five Ranfurly Street remained in the hands of the Soanes family until 1952. The significance of this house lies in the fact that Harry Soanes built it not just as a family home but also to display his professional skills. Although a standard square villa, it is exceptional for the quality of the materials and the decorative details, such as the brick corbels under the eaves, the detailed brick chimneys, the plaster undersills of the sash windows on either side of the front door, and the verandah with its cast-iron work and tiled floor.

Philip Soanes sold no. 41 to George Hickmott, a brewer, in 1908, moving to 177 Bealey Street, and in the 1930s to 906 Colombo Street. The house he built at 41 Ranfurly Street remained in the Hickmott family until 1941, when it was sold to Isabel Eleanor Regnault, wife of Robert Hume Regnault, clerk. In 1944 it was sold to Patrick Joseph Molloy, also a clerk. The Molloy family occupied the house until 2002, when it was bought by Nicolas and Tracey Tyler.

Arthur and Christina Soanes resided at 105 Forfar Street St Albans and their only child Muriel continued to live in that house for the rest of her life. Her mother, Christina (Gorrie), was a talented artist. Arthur Soanes was reputedly one of the best bricklayers in Christchurch. Many examples of the homes he built are still standing today.  

 

 Oxford born builder Henry Soanes and his wife Sarah Bint who had migrated from London to Christchurch on the Lancashire Witch in 1863 were to have at least seven children, Henry Albert Soanes (1859), John (1863), Philip Walter (1867), Herbert (1870), Harriet (1872), Rose (1880), and Ethel (1882). One of their grand-children (a son of Harriet) was Montague Harry Holcroft the prominent New Zealand  journalist and author.

Arthur Soanes was born at Christchurch, New Zealand in 1881 the grandson of Henry and Sarah.  Arthur's father was builder Henry Albert Soanes (1860-1937) and his mother was London born Elisa Allman (1859), the sister of Philip Bint's wife Charlotte Allman.

He married Christina Gorrie (1884-1948) in 1914 and their daughter Muriel Soanes was born in 1917. The family lived at 105 Forfar Street, St. Albans.

Henry & Elisa Soanes had seven children, all boys - Arthur 1881, Bertie 1883, Frank 1886, Percy 1887, Herbert 1891, Albert 1894, and Gilbert Alfred 1904. Henry Soanes, and Philip Soanes worked together, and described themselves as builders and bricklayers.

In April 1899 they bought adjacent quarter acre sections in a small St Albans subdivision, and took the opportunity to build a pair of houses that demonstrated their professional skill. Harry's former house at 45 Ranfurly Street  is an elaborately detailed double brick square villa, with a terracotta tile roof. 

A postcard dated December 1908 to Charlotte Bint from her sister Elisa Soanes showing her sons Frank & Percy Soanes in a model N Ford

from Stephanie's Collection

 

Next door at 41 Ranfurly Street is Philip's former residence. This house, a double brick return bay villa, is similarly constructed, but with plastered details rather than the plain moulded brick of the former, and has an iron roof.

45 Ranfurly Street. This three-bedroom house was built in 1899 by Arthur's father, Harry Soanes, a bricklayer and builder. He and his brother, Philip, purchased adjacent sections in St Albans and both built homes for their families. (Philip's house, 41 Ranfurly Street, is also registered by the New Zealand Historic Places Trust Pouhere Taonga).  Forty-five Ranfurly Street remained in the hands of the Soanes family until 1952.

The significance of this house lies in the fact that Harry Soanes built it not just as a family home but also to display his professional skills. Although a standard square villa, it is exceptional for the quality of the materials and the decorative details, such as the brick corbels under the eaves, the detailed brick chimneys, the plaster undersills of the sash windows on either side of the front door, and the verandah with its cast-iron work and tiled floor.

Philip Soanes sold no. 41 to George Hickmott, a brewer, in 1908, moving to 177 Bealey Street, and in the 1930s to 906 Colombo Street. The house he built at 41 Ranfurly Street remained in the Hickmott family until 1941, when it was sold to Isabel Eleanor Regnault, wife of Robert Hume Regnault, clerk. In 1944 it was sold to Patrick Joseph Molloy, also a clerk. The Molloy family occupied the house until 2002, when it was bought by Nicolas and Tracey Tyler.

Arthur and Christina Soanes resided at 105 Forfar Street, St Albans and their only child Muriel continued to live in that house for the rest of her life. Her mother, Christina (Gorrie), was a talented artist. Arthur Soanes was reputedly one of the best bricklayers in Christchurch. Many examples of the homes he built are still standing today.  Photo from Stephanie's collection

 

 

On 19 September 1893 the governor, Lord Glasgow, signed a new Electoral Act into law. As a result of this landmark legislation, New Zealand became the first self-governing country in the world in which all women had the right to vote in parliamentary elections.

In most other democracies – including Britain and the United States – women did not win the right to the vote until after the First World War. New Zealand’s world leadership in women’s suffrage became a central part of our image as a trail-blazing ‘social laboratory’.

That achievement was the result of years of effort by suffrage campaigners, led by Kate Sheppard. In 1891, 1892 and 1893 they compiled a series of massive petitions calling on Parliament to grant the vote to women. In recent years Sheppard’s contribution to New Zealand’s history has been acknowledged on the $10 note.

Almost a quarter of the New Zealand female adult population signed this in 1893. Arthur's grandmother Sarah (Bint) Soanes living at High Street, St. Albans was one of them. (St. Albans -sheet 176)

 

 

Memories of Early Taranaki by Arthur (Brick) Soanes - written in 1963

My memories even at the age of 82 take me back to the year 1888. Although then a lad of 8 years, in Standard 3, this year was a trying time for parents and tradesmen as there was a slump without work for 9 months. Something had to be done and carpenters, painters, bricklayers and even cabbies had to migrate to a different kind of life in the bush.

Four of my uncles took up a 453 acre block called the Moa Block, Huiroa District, 10 miles from Inglewood and 3 miles from Tarata township. They took it in turns to establish a farm and I remember well the preparations for our family to take its turn of early bushwacking and cow spanking in 1889.

 Father attended sales by an auctioneer to get equipment such as a cheese press, vats necessary for cheese making, a separator called Alexandra, a swiss product side saddle and timber jacks for stumping, and a churn. All these were duly packed as well as furniture for the trip and sent to Lyttlelton the day before. We slept on the floor and were up early to pack another case to be forwarded for the steamer trip in the Takapuna leaving mid afternoon for Wellington and New Plymouth. We arrived at Wellington in the early morning and sailed later the next afternoon for our new abode, arriving mid morning the next day.

It was great excitement to three of us boys seeing the Sugar Loaves and the Breakwater at Port Taranaki. We disembarked and had to put up at a hotel close to the beach. I remember father and I going on to that beach the next morning after the furniture and effects were on the train. Our eyes were strained on the scenery which was a railway with bush on both sides and sawmills everywhere.

We duly arrived at Inglewood about 10 o’clock. We had morning tea at Turners and later dinner at the Junction Hotel. The furniture was transferred from the train to Joe George’s wagon. Joe incidentally was mail man and at 1 o’clock we moved off. Some of us were on foot and mother and the youngest brother were aboard the wagon which had to travel over roads not metalled, full of ruts, and up and down hills as there was very little flat country.

There were four or five houses seen from the road and three rivers to cross and these fortunately had bridges. An uncle came out to Kiamata and two of us had relays on horseback which was a new sensation. Having heard of wild pigs, we were anxious to see these and to our surprise as the day was closing in we saw pigs but not wild ones. They were domestic ones without ears and we were told the reason for this. When they got out on the road, Tweed, the dog, had chewed their ears off, being used to holding wild pigs by the ear.

The track from the Junction to our farm was on a survey for a road to be formed 1 mile long off Tariki Road and we passed our farm house to go to Aunt Charlotte’s for tea. Fifteen of us sat down to young suckling pig, parsnips, carrots and Doughboys. As our beds and furniture were not available till the next day we had to stay the night.

Next day the pack saddle was brought into being. The packmen who had to trek through a clearing track for a short cut carried bedsteads, chests of drawers and other items which the pack horse could not manipulate, as well as fallen trees for bridges over gullies.

The house on our farm was about 20 feet from a creek with two wooden steps to the door and built with wooden piles. The timber was adzed weather boards up and down with fillets. It was scrimmed and papered with newspapers. There were four rooms, and shingle roof and iron chimney with bars across for hooking a camp oven in which to bake bread and also for hooking big boilers for vegetables etc. Our garden was across the creek and this had to increased by stumping and planting.

The dairy was established although previously tunnel caves had been in use for pans. These huge pans of mild were skimmed with a skimmer before the separator came into used and how we used to like to put our cup out for separator milk. The cream was made into butter which was put into 70 lb round barrels until the square white pine boxes were used. Think of it, market price 4 ½ d first grade [butter] and a deduction of ½ d for second grade! I remember once the cream getting overheated and this was put in a muslin bag and a sack by father and buried. It was dug up again and made into butter, for this was the product that really made the farm and was subject to such men as Newton King and others who had control of this industry as far as stock was concerned.

Now I must pay attention to the way of living garden projects. This was unique, for besides vegetables, such things as hops were grown, Linseed for poultices, Caraway seed for seedcake and tobacco. I remember a huge Bucateer [sic] tree where all stumps were burnt producing potash and some wonderful roots of White Elephant potatoes popular at that time.

The bush had plenty of scope for one’s appetite with goggies, a sweet fruit, Konini berries , wild fuchsia and the heart of Nikau , all eaten. Wild honey was sought , after a tree with a swarm of wild bees was chopped through ready to fall. This was best done at night time with a smoker to tackle same and produced as much as two 16 gallon baths of honey. Among the novelty jams that were made were wild blackberry, melon and pumpkin and carrots.

To make variety in food there were pheasants, pigeons and pigs as mutton was supplied only once a week by the butcher. Wild cattle were sought after for a change but one had to trek miles for these and usually try to carry more than human strength could negotiate. Eels supplied the major part of our fish diet and a large one would be smoked up the chimney .

Activities on the farm included cows to milk. Twelve was my quota followed by a three mile walk through one mile of bush to school. After school cows to milk again and then to bed. School holidays were spent grass seeding. Cocksfoot and Italian Rye grass was to be thrashed. After cutting this was dried out and carried in a sheet to the thrashing ground which was generally a level spot with a gig sheet. The heads were all placed in the middle and a flail (long stick with another smaller one attached with leather) was used to beat out the seed. When this was taking place, refreshments were supplied by a limejuice bottle beverage and oatmeal water. Underscrubbing bush before falling for burning in March had to be done as well as firewood cutting for fuel. Mostly we used Tawa burnt green and ToiToi, heaps of which were used in a day. Shingles had to be billeted for cow shed, dairy and roofs of other farm essentials. This was done with a knife, after the style of a butchers chopper. We gathered fungus jelly on fallen bush which was dried and sold to Japanese for making oil. Posts had to be split for fencing and the gully dammed up for swimming in the summer time.

New Year’s day, sports were held at Tarata and a dance in the evening. I remember a shrewd move that went wrong. Father delayed milking the cows so as they would be on their regular timetable next day. On one occasion, we went earlier that father and he duly arrived to give music at the dance with his concertina. We boys, ahead of the others, arrived home at midnight to find to our surprise that the cows were all at the cowshed, some bailed up backways and frontways with milk running from them. At 1.00am when our parents returned another picnic started. We had to milk again and get calves out of the creek. As cows rested for two months of the year, except one for our own use, winter evenings were spent playing cards, chess and draughts. Often cousin Jim would make off down the road for home after 1.30 am.

Accidents were always happening in the bush with slashers and axes slipping. My brother, Frank, who was left handed, cut the top off his thumb whilst grass seeding and father chewed a wad of tobacco and put it on again wrapping it up in chewed tobacco. This healed without showing it had happened. A cadet on our farm was underscrubbing and a slasher cut across his foot. After carrying him some distance to the house, father and aunt Charlotte (Bint) sewed it with ordinary thread as a doctor’s help straight away was impossible.

Communication would have had to be made by horseback and would have taken at least two days. Everything turned out successful and cadet Bill Hurly left us on Xmas Day which we thought very unusual. Killing a tame pig without a knife was one of my mistakes caused through giving it blood milk from a cow calving. I was advised it was blown and it was buried for dogs meat.

The cheese press supplied us with cheese after rennet was mixed with milk. This was probably before a cheese factory came into being in Taranaki.

We boys had three visits to Inglewood township in three years. It may be been four for me with two bags of fungus on a horse. In the slack season, the men worked on the Zig Zag to Tarata to make a road for vehicle traffic the first year after our introduction to Taranaki. After that, bullock wagons with 16 steers were seen hauling timber to the outblocks. Papa rock had to be hewed in cuttings and wheel barrowed over sides. There was no metal road till about four years later. While at the farm, our road, the Kohiti Rd was formed during our stay and bridges built. The contractor was Mr. Bligh. A tent was erected about half way along the road just outside our vegetable garden. There was a galley and the bedstead was composed of Punga Trees, and Fern and a mattress. Over this was placed an oilsheet and blankets.

During a period of a fortnight’s continuous rain, the creek swelled enormously and trees and everything went swirling by. This caused anxiety as the water reached the flooring of the house and all food had to be raised on tables. It abated and all was well again. However all one could use on the road was a sledge.

The Schoolhouse had a living room for the master and a schoolroom. All classes were in one room. The master was handy to afternoon tea and he often found he had overstayed. Somehow the clock advanced half an hour! There were about thirty scholars and most of them arrived on horses, some three abreast.

Well, after 3 ½ years father came to Christchurch to see another brother who was to take his turn. He having married in the meantime, he rejected his taking over so father came back, sold up the stock and packed again for Canterbury.

I had to go to Tarata to pay for the school books and my trip resulted in a refund. The furniture was packed again and our farewell was on foot. We called at neighbours en route to say goodbye. Mother rode on horseback with Aunty [Charlotte] on another. Father was with the mailman and the wagon trailing behind. We were waiting anxiously at Inglewood as it was near train time and there was no wagon arriving. The pole shaft had broken and another had to be cut from the bush and lashed on. They just made it and that night we sailed from New Plymouth .

There was no main trunk railway line in those days but oil and iron were in the news. The Budget which we got once a week after a two mile walk for the same.

Two days later we were at our home in Christchurch. At the age of 14 years I left St Albans school to be in a bicycle shop in the days of the Penny Farthings or bone shakers as they called them. I made and fitted spokes to there and afterwards managed the plating department but rouge and emery dust affected my throat. Afterwards I followed the occupation of bricklayer and drainlayer till retiring and was nicknamed "Tary" at school after Taranaki.

PS. This may be of interest to younger generations. It gives an insight in to junior pioneering. The pioneers enjoyed every minute of their experiences and hardships as they are called today and can appreciate the easier life they now have. They can look ahead a day and think of their past in their spare time.

 

 

Scout Leader Arthur (Brick) Soanes and the St. Matthew's L.L.O Scout Group - Colombo Street, St. Albans 1946.

 

This scout group was first formed in the early 1920s

 

St. Albans Scouts 1946

Our sincere gratitude to Steve Dunford their Group Historian

 

Do you have any memories of this photo or the group at that time? Please contact me if you have anything you would like to share with us.        tom.bint2@gmail.com

 

 

Greetings Tom

Well what a pleasant surprise.  I am delighted you drew this to my attention. I cannot recall having a copy but with all our earthquakes a lot of my papers are all mixed. So I printed up the material you sent and the photo is very clear. After all these years too.

Good luck with your further researching. We all admired Brick Soanes. He showed me an amateur radio receiver and got me interested.  I am still registered as ZL3ABC but not very active now.

Anyway thanks again. I have copied Bruce (McKessar) here and will try to contact others in the photo.

I recall Brick in Warrington St. He had a nice daughter too.  Cheers -  Ron Hooker         2nd August 2012

 

 

 

A 2006 memory of Arthur's only child, Muriel Soanes (1917- 2001) 

 

Five years ago one of Christchurch's St Albans Stalwarts suddenly died. She had provided the inspiration for the formation of the St Albans History Group and was a regular contributor to the Groups Work. We honour her memory today by recording a little of her life. Muriel Soanes was born in Christchurch on January 24th 1917, the only child of Arthur & Christina Soanes (nee Gorrie). They lived at 105 Forfar Street St Albans and Muriel continued to live in that house for the rest of her life. 

She was a quiet child well behaved good natured and although not spoiled she wanted for little. Arthur Soanes was one of the best bricklayers in Christchurch. Many examples of the homes he built are still standing today. 

Christina was a talented artist a skill she passed on to her daughter Muriel and it was one of her regrets she was not allowed to attend Art School and pursue this love. Muriel attended St Albans Primary School from 31st January 1922 before going on to Christchurch Girls High School in 1930 for her secondary education. Attendance at Digbys Commercial College, where she learned the necessary skills, opened a career in secretarial and bookkeeping work. Muriel was also a talented pianist and for some time taught music from home. Although Muriel matured into a lovely young woman she never married.

Her mother died in 1948 at an early age and Muriel accepted that it was her duty to care for her father. This she did until he died in 1966. Muriel had a number of interests, but gardening was her passion. She was an excellent cook and first class baker. She was deeply involved with her own local community, both preserving the past and protecting the future. Recognition came in the form of a Community Service Award from the Community Board. 

A strong-willed woman Muriel became very involved in the fight to save the planned northern motorway cutting through her beloved St Albans She spent not weeks, but years sitting through Council meetings, taking notes, and writing letters to the Council voicing her strong opposition to the plan. The eventual scrapping of the proposal was taken as a personal triumph by Muriel and reinforced her belief that with sound reasoning the authorities could be made to change their plans.

Muriel never drove a car herself, either riding her bicycle or walking to get around the area. She was always well dressed, good natured and possessed a delightful dry sense of humour. She was a good ,honest genuine woman with a great heart and soul. Remember Muriel as she would like to be remembered.

Honour her memory and speak her name with love. Muriel's home is well loved by its present owners a prominent Christchurch broadcaster and her husband and children. Dr. Livingstone 2006

 

 

Harry Soanes by his nephew Wally Smith

 

My Uncle Harry Soanes had his own claim to fame. When the Dutch painter Van der Velden who also resided at St.Albans, Christchurch saw the magnificent moustache that Harry sported, he hired him as a model. Tiring of the sittingsSoanes family & Petrus van derVelden the reluctant subject shaved his face. 

When Van der Velden saw him he exclaimed "Mein Gott! Vat haf you done?".  

The painting was completed from memory, and the artist added a drinking mug to Harry's hand, and his wife and daughter peering over his shoulder.  The overall effect was of a bar-room, with Harry drinking, and the barmaids making overtures to him.

As a postscript, Harry's brother Philip saw the painting in an auction room twenty years later, purchased it and hung it in his home gallery with other paintings by the same artist.

On my occasional visits to Philip's gallery, I would stand enthralled in front of "The Drinker" and wonder at the accuracy of the features portrayed of my long deceased uncle."

 

The paragraph above was my recall of my Uncle P.W.Soanes' recollection of Van der Velden's portrait of his brother, and related to me seventy years ago. My cousin's daughter, Miss Muriel Soanes, on reading my article, delved into her newspaper cuttings, and sent me a copy of a reporter's item,

(Sun Newspaper, Christchurch) "Recollections of P.Van der Velden" circa 1950.

 

He reported - " Recollections of Petrus Van der Velden, the great Dutch artist who lived in Christchurch for about 20 years, were given to a "Sun" reporter by Mr. Philip W.Soanes of 906 Colombo St., who knew Van der Velden well, and who now has a very representative collection of his paintings and drawings.

Mr. Soanes said that the article on Van der Velden's life and work published in "The Sun" last Saturday had aroused a great deal of interest, and had been very highly spoken of by many persons.  There is in the possession of Mr. Soanes a very interesting picture, a copy of a painting by Van der Velden entitled "A Story of the Sea." The original now hangs in the Suter Art Gallery at Nelson.  It shows an old sailor in a taproom, spinning a yarn. Behind him are two figures, and these were posed by Mrs.Van der Velden and her daughter.

The model for the sailor was Mr. Soanes' brother, Mr.H.A.Soanes who now lives at 45 Ranfurly Street.

About 40 years ago Mr. Soanes and his brother were working on a building job in Durham St., when Van der Velden who lived nearby, came to them and said that he wanted to paint Mr.H.A.Soanes.  The latter demurred. The artist promised him one shilling per hour, as much fine Dutch tobacco as he could smoke, cups of coffee, a picture for himself, and a generally good time, and persuaded by his brother, he agreed to sit. 

At this time Mr.H.A.Soanes had a fine "walrus" moustache, which may have been one of the reasons why Van der Velden wanted him for a model.   But the painting was a long time in being finished, and in the meantime fashions for men had changed. Moustaches went out of fashion and clean-shaven faces came in. When the artist went to Mr.Soanes and asked him to continue sitting so that the picture might be completed, the Dutchman held up his hands in horror and indignation and exclaimed: "My God, you haf ruined the picture! Where is your lofly moustache?"   

So Mr.Soanes grew his moustache again, and the painting was completed.   Mr P.W. Soanes has a sketch which he thinks shows two bailiffs whom Van der Velden used as models while they were staying at his house, because he could not pay for the erection of his studios."

Van der Velden and my uncles have been deceased many years, but the memory of the painting is as vivid in my mind as though it were yesterday. and to confirm my recollection, the newspaper cutting presents the actual picture, a black and white print substituting for the glorious coloured artistry of yesteryear. Wally Smith 

 

Grandad Phil Soanes lived in Colombo Street next to St Mary's College where Barbara went to school. The property L shaped through to Bealy Ave and when he died it became a drive-through wine and spirit merchants.  He died at Christchurch Hospital, Canterbury in 1956 aged 89.

 

'In the painting titled "The Story Teller", the subject is known to be Mr Henry Albert Soanes of Christchurch.' - The curator of the Suter Gallery.

 

I am related to Sarah Bint via my grandfather Herbert Soanes 1891-1974. I was in Nelson in September and was interested in linking the Oil on canvas of Henry Albert Soanes painted by Petrus Van Der Velden. The curator of the Suter Gallery gave me a link to the painting titled "The Story Teller" which you refer to in the Arthur Soanes link as "The Drinker"

It has been of interest to me that an oil painting which was hung in Arthur Soanes hall way in Forfar St of Great Grandfather was thought to be a copy of that in the Suter Gallery. On questioning the painting with the curator, she did a search on the web looking for key words Petrus Van Der Velden and came up with the article on The Bint Family.

I believe the painting which hung in Arthur Soanes hall way, until the passing of his daughter Muriel Soanes in 2005, may be the "picture of himself" as referred to in your article. I was taught piano for 4 years by Muriel at Forfar St, so have clear memories of the painting. Do you have the article from the Sun Newspaper, Christchurch "Recollections of P. Van Der Velden" circa 1950?   Graham Evans  October 2015

 

 

Montague Harry Holcroft 1902-1993 (registered at birth as Joyce Harry) was born on 14 May 1902 in Rangiora, where his father, Harry Cooper Holcroft, a salesman, was about to buy a grocery shop. His mother, Harriet Emily Soanes, came from a large and well-established Christchurch family. 

 Monte was the second of three brothers. He attended Rangiora School and, after the family moved to Christchurch in 1910, attended Elmwood School. In 1916 he started at Christchurch Boys High School, but the next year, after his father’s grocery business failed, he left to work as office boy and then invoice clerk at Aulsebrook’s biscuit factory. His mother died soon after. 

Monte journeyed to Australia in 1921 with his best friend Mark Lund. There he met and married his first wife, Eileen Allanah Mclean at Paddington, New South Wales in 1923. Eileen McLean was a seamstress and the couple's only child, Allan, was born in there in 1924.

In July 1931 Monte Holcroft married his second wife, Aralia (Ray) Jaslie Seldon Dale in Wellington in New Zealand’s North Island. The couple moved to Christchurch in New Zealand’s South Island in 1932 had two children Anthony and Jocelyn. Anthony Holcroft followed in his father’s footsteps and became a children’s author. He married Julia and the couple had three children.

 He wrote for the Southland Times, beginning in 1936. He  was offered the editorship of the New Zealand Listener in Wellington in 1949 but his wife refused to return to Wellington and the couple separated and later divorced. Holcroft moved to Paekakariki, 45 km north-east of Wellington and met Lorna Lund, who used to be married to his best friend Mark Lund, and married her in September 1962.

Monte is also known for helping to found the New Zealand branch of UNESCO

His novels  were - Beyond the Breakers, 1928, The Flameless Fire, 1931, and Brazilian Daughter, 1931.

 



contact me at tom.bint2@gmail.com 

 

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